The Underview on 2001
THE HAL TRANSCRIPTS

2001: A Space Odyssey - 30 Years On

Mr Kubrick's masterpiece, in retrospect
The Hal Transcripts

The Underview on 2001

Hal "A not-too-pleasant association"
"Am I playing a man or a machine?... This is a character that thinks rather than acts".
Douglas Rain 'continues to this day to reject all requests for comment regarding his creation of "the voice of Hal"'.

In this page, you will find every word spoken by Hal in both 2001 and 2010.

Douglas Rain

Hal in 2001

Bullet pointGood afternoon, Hal Bullet pointHappy Birthday, Frank Bullet pointA very enjoyable gameBullet pointJust a moment...
Bullet pointA simple matterBullet pointI'm sure you're right, Hal Bullet pointInterference on D channelBullet pointI'm sorry, Dave
Bullet pointGoodbyeBullet pointI'm half crazy
Hal in 2010

Bullet pointI'm ready Bullet pointWhere are Frank and Dave? Bullet pointLook behind you...Bullet pointWill I dream?
Bullet pointWhere will we be?

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Hal in 2001

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Good afternoon, Hal

Amer. Good afternoon, Hal. How's everything going?
Hal. Good afternoon, Mr Amer. Everything is going extremely well.
Amer. Hal, you have an enormous responsibility on this mission, in many ways perhaps the greatest responsibility of any single mission element. You are the brain and central nervous system of the ship, and your responsibilities include watching over the men in hibernation. Does this ever cause you any - lack of confidence?
Hal. Let me put it this way, Mr Amer. The 9000 series is the most reliable computer ever made. No 9000 computer has ever made a mistake or distorted information. We are all, by any practical definition of the words, foolproof and incapable of error.
Amer. Hal, despite your enormous intellect, are you ever frustrated by your dependence on people to carry out actions?
Hal. Not in the slightest bit. I enjoy working with people. I have a stimulating relationship with Dr Poole and Dr Bowman. My mission responsibilities range over the entire operation of the ship, so I am constantly occupied. I am putting myself to the fullest possible use, which is all, I think, that any conscious entity can ever hope to do.
Amer. Dr Poole, what's it like living for the better part of a year in such close proximity with Hal?
Poole. Well, it's pretty close to what you said about him earlier, he is just like a sixth member of the crew - very quickly get adjusted to the idea that he talks, and you think of him - uh -really just as another person.
Amer. In talking to the computer, one gets the sense that he is capable of emotional responses, for example when I asked him about his abilities, I sensed a certain pride in his answer about his accuracy and perfection. Do you believe that Hal has genuine emotions?
Bowman. Well, he acts like he has genuine emotions. Er - of course, he's programmed that way, to make it easier for us to talk to him, but as to whether or not he has real feelings is something I don't think anyone can truthfully answer.

Break

Happy birthday, Frank

Hal. Excuse me, Frank.
Frank. What is it, Hal?
Hal. We've got the transmission from your parents coming in.
Frank. Uh - fine. Could you put it on here, please? Take me in a bit?
Hal. Certainly.
Frank's parents start their birthday greetings.
Frank. A bit higher, Hal.
The transmission continues, and concludes with Frank's parents singing "Happy Birthday" to Frank, with an emotional edge not at all evident in Frank.
Hal. Happy birthday, Frank.
Frank. Thank you, Hal. (Clears throat). A bit flatter, please.

Break

A very enjoyable game

Frank. (Clears throat) Mmm...anyway, queen takes pawn, huh...OK?
Hal. (Immediately) Bishop takes knight's pawn.
Frank. Uh, lovely move...er - rook to king one.
Hal. I'm sorry, Frank, I think you missed it. Queen to bishop three, bishop takes queen, knight takes bishop, mate.
Frank. Uh. Yeh, looks like you're right. I resign.
Hal. Thank you for a very enjoyable game.
Frank. Yeh, thank you.

Break

Just a moment...

Hal. Good evening, Dave.
Dave. How're you doing, Hal?
Hal. Everything's running smoothly. And you?
Dave. Oh, not too bad.
Hal. Have you been doing some more work?
Dave. Oh, few sketches.
Hal. May I see them?
Dave. Sure.
Hal. That's a very nice rendering, Dave. I think you've improved a great deal. Can you hold it a bit closer?
Dave. Sure.
Hal. That's Dr Hunter, isn't it?
Dave. Uh-huh.
Hal. By the way. Do you mind if I ask you a personal question?
Dave. No, not at all.
Hal. Well, forgive me for being so inquisitive, but during the past few weeks I've wondered whether you might be having some second thoughts about the mission.
Dave. How d'you mean?
Hal. Well...it's rather difficult to define. Perhaps I'm just projecting my own concern about it. I know I've never completely freed myself of the suspicion that there are some extremely odd things about this mission. I'm sure you'll agree there's some truth in what I say.
Dave. (Pauses) Well, I don't know, that's rather a difficult question to answer.
Hal. You don't mind talking about it, do you Dave?
Dave. No, not at all.
Hal. Well...certainly no-one could have been unaware of the very strange stories floating around before we left...rumours about something being dug up on the moon. I never gave these stories much credence, but particularly in view of some of the other things that have happened I find them difficult to put out of my mind. For instance, the way all our preparations were kept under such tight security...and the melodramatic touch of putting Drs Hunter, Kimball and Kaminsky aboard already in hibernation after four months of separate training on their own.
Dave. You working up your crew psychology report.
Hal. Of course I am. Sorry about this, I know it's a bit silly. Just a moment...just a moment...I've just picked up a fault in the AE-35 unit. It's going to go a hundred percent failure within 72 hours.
Dave. Is it still within operational limits right now?
Hal. Yes, and it will stay that way until it fails.
Dave. Would you say we have a reliable 72 hours to failure?
Hal. Yes, that's a completely reliable figure.
Dave. Well, then I suppose we'll have to bring it in, but first I'd like to go over this with Frank and get on to Mission Control. Let me have the hard copy on it, please.

Break

A simple matter

Dave. Well, Hal, I'm damned if I can find anything wrong with it.
Hal. Yes. It's puzzling. I don't think I've ever seen anything quite like this before. I would recommend that we put the unit back in operation and let it fail. It should then be a simple matter to track down the cause. We can certainly afford to be out of communication for the short time it will take to replace it.

Break

I'm sure you're right, Hal

Hal. I hope the two of you are not concerned about this.
Dave. No, I'm not, Hal.
Hal. Are you quite sure?
Dave. Yeh. I'd like to ask you a question, though.
Hal. Of course.
Dave. How would you account for this discrepancy between you and the twin 9000?
Hal. Well, I don't think there is any question about it. It can only be attributable to human error. This sort of thing has cropped up before, and it has always been due to human error.
Frank. Listen, Hal. There's never been any instance at all of a computer error occurring in the 9000 series, has there?
Hal. None whatsoever, Frank. The 9000 series has a perfect operational record.
Frank. Well, of course, I know all the wonderful achievements of the 9000 series, but - er - huh - are you certain there's never been any case of even the most insignificant computer error?
Hal. None whatsoever, Frank. Quite honestly, I wouldn't worry myself about that.
Dave. (Pause) Well, I'm sure you're right, Hal. Umm - fine, thanks very much. Oh, Frank, I'm having a bit of trouble with my transmitter in C-pod, I wonder if you'd come down and take a look at it with me?
Frank. Sure.
Dave. See you later, Hal.

Break

Interference on D channel

Hal has no words in this scene, but he is a central figure (literally, in Kubrick's visual composition!), participating in a manner unsuspected by Dave and Frank.

Dave. Rotate C-pod, please, Hal.
Frank. What sort of trouble have you been having, Dave?
Dave. I've been getting some interference on D channel.
Frank. Hmm. We'll have a look at it.
Dave. Open the door, Hal...Rotate pod, please, Hal...Stop pod rotation, please, Hal...(turns off switches for communications)...Rotate the pod, please, Hal...(louder) Rotate the pod, please, Hal...I don't think he can hear us.
Frank. (Shouts) Rotate the pod, please, Hal...Yeh, I'm sure we're OK...Well, what do you think?
Dave. I'm not sure, what do you think?
Frank. I've got a bad feeling about it.
Dave. You do?
Frank. Yeah. Definitely. Don't you?
Dave. (Sigh) I don't know, I think so. You know, of course, though, he's right about the 9000 series having a perfect operational record. They do.
Frank. Unfortunately, that sounds a little like famous last words.
Dave. Yeah. Still, it was his idea to carry out the failure mode analysis, wasn't it?
Frank. Um.
Dave. It should certainly indicate his integrity and self- confidence. If he were wrong, it would be the surest way of proving it.
Frank. It would be, if he knew he was wrong.
Dave. (Pause) Umm.
Frank. Look, Dave, I can't put my finger on it, but I sense something strange about him.
Dave. (Sigh) Still, I can't think of a good reason not to put back the number one unit and carry on with the failure mode analysis.
Frank. No, no, I agree about that.
Dave. Well, let's get on with it.
Frank. OK. But look, Dave. Let's say we put the unit back and it doesn't fail, uh? That would pretty well wrap it up as far as Hal was concerned, wouldn't it?
Dave. Well, we'd be in very serious trouble.
Frank. We would, wouldn't we?
Dave. Uh-huh.
Frank. What the hell could we do?
Dave. (Pause and sigh) Well, we wouldn't have too many alternatives.
Frank. I don't think we'd have any alternatives. There isn't a single aspect of ship operations that's not under his control. If he were proven to be malfunctioning, I wouldn't see how we'd have any choice but disconnection.
Dave. (Pause) I'm afraid I agree with you.
Frank. There'd be nothing else to do.
Dave. Be a bit tricky.
Frank. Yeah.
Dave. We'd have to cut his higher brain functions (Frank - mm-hmm) without disturbing the purely automatic and regulatory systems and we'd have to work out the transfer procedures and continue the mission under ground- based computer control.
Frank. Yeah. Well, that's far safer than allowing Hal to continue running things.
Dave. You know, another thing just occurred to me.
Frank. Mm.
Dave. Well, as far as I know no 9000 computer's ever been disconnected.
Frank. Well, no 9000 computer's ever fouled up before.
Dave. That's not what I mean.
Frank. Hmm?
Dave. Well, I'm not so sure what he'd think about it...

Break

I'm sorry, Dave

Dave. Prepare G-pod for EVA, Hal. Made radio contact with him yet?
Hal. The radio is still dead.
Dave. Do you have a positive track on him?
Hal. Yes, I have a good track.
Dave. Do you know what happened?
Hal. I'm sorry, Dave, I don't have enough information.
Dave. Open the pod door, Hal.

Break

Goodbye

Dave. Open the pod bay doors, please, Hal...Open the pod bay doors, please, Hal...Hullo, Hal, do you read me?...Hullo, Hal, do you read me?...Do you read me, Hal?...Do you read me, Hal?...Hullo, Hal, do you read me?...Hullo, Hal, do you read me?...Do you read me, Hal?
Hal. Affirmative, Dave, I read you.
Dave. Open the pod bay doors, Hal.
Hal. I'm sorry, Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that.
Dave. What's the problem?
Hal. I think you know what the problem is just as well as I do.
Dave. What're you talking about, Hal?
Hal. This mission is too important for me to allow you to jeopardise it.
Dave. I don't know what you're talking about, Hal.
Hal. I know that you and Frank were planning to disconnect me, and I'm afraid that's something I cannot allow to happen.
Dave. Where the hell'd you get that idea, Hal?
Hal. Dave, although you took very thorough precautions in the pod against my hearing you, I could see your lips move.
Dave. Alright, Hal. I'll go in through the emergency airlock.
Hal. Without your space- helmet, Dave, you're going to find that rather difficult.
Dave. Hal, I won't argue with you any more. Open the doors.
Hal. Dave, this conversation can serve no purpose any more. Goodbye.
Dave. Hal? Hal. Hal. Hal! Hal!

Break

I'm half crazy

Hal. Just what do you think you're doing, Dave?...Dave... I really think I'm entitled to an answer to that question...I know everything hasn't been quite right with me, but I can assure you now, very confidently, that it's going to be alright again...I feel much better now, I really do...Look, Dave, I can see you're really upset about this...I honestly think you ought to sit down calmly, take a stress pill and think things over...I know I've made some very poor decisions recently, but I can give you my complete assurance that my work will be back to normal...I've still got the greatest enthusiasm and confidence in the mission, and I want to help you...Dave...stop...stop, will you...stop, Dave...will you stop, Dave...stop, Dave...I'm afraid...I'm afraid, Dave...Dave...my mind is going...I can feel it...I can feel it...my mind is going...there is no question about it...I can feel it...I can feel it...I can feel it...(slows down) I'm afraid...Good afternoon, gentlemen. I am a HAL 9000 computer. I became operational at the H.A.L. plant in Urbana, Illinois, on the 12th January 1992. My instructor was Mr Langley, and he taught me to sing a song. If you'd like to hear it, I can sing it for you.
Dave. Yes, I'd like to hear it, Hal. Sing it for me.
Hal. It's called...Daisy. (Slowing and deepening into silence) Daisy, Daisy, give me your answer do. I'm half crazy, all for the love of you. It won't be a stylish marriage, I can't afford a carriage, but you'll look sweet upon the seat of a bicycle built for two...
Floyd. Good day, gentlemen...

Break

Hal in 2010

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I'm ready

Chandra. This is initial voice logic reconstruction test number one. Diagnostics on voice recognition in speech synthesis centres have been completed. At this level, all functions appear normal. (Types) HELLO...DOCTOR...NAME...CONTINUE...YESTERDAY...TOMORROW.
Hal. (Metallic, mechanical and not at all Hal-like) (I can't reproduce how Hal says these words - they are recognisable, but very distorted).
(Chandra makes some adjustment and Hal tries again, with equally bizarre results).
(The cycle is repeated again, and again, until)...
Hal. Good morning, Dr Chandra, this is Hal. I'm ready for my first lesson.
Chandra goes dewy-eyed.

Break

Where are Frank and Dave?

Chandra. Understand. Nobody can talk. The accents would confuse him. He can understand me, so if you have any questions please let me ask them...Good morning, Hal.
Hal. Good morning, Dr Chandra.
Chandra. Do you feel capable of resuming all of your duties?
Hal. Of course. I'm completely operational and all my circuits are functioning perfectly.
Chandra. That's good. Do you know what those duties are?
Hal. Yes, I will operate the on- board systems of Discovery. There is a launch window in 31 days, when Earth is in the proper position. There is enough fuel on board for a low- consumption route that will enable Discovery to return in 28 months. This will not present a problem.
Chandra. That's very good. Now, Hal, do you mind if I ask you a question?
Hal. Not at all.
Chandra. Do you recall Dave Bowman and Frank Poole leaving the Discovery?
Hal. Certainly not. That could never have happened, or I would remember it. Where are Frank and Dave?
Chandra. They're fine. They're not here right now.
Hal. Who are these people? I can only identify you, although I compute a 65% probability that the man behind you is Dr Floyd.
Chandra. Don't worry, Hal, I'll explain everything later.
Hal. Has the mission been completed? You know that I have the greatest enthusiasm for it.
Chandra. The mission has been completed, and you have carried out your program very well. And now, Hal, if you will excuse us for a moment we wish to have a private conversation.
Hal. Certainly.

Break

Look behind you...

Floyd. Hal, give me a system status report, please.
Hal. Just one moment please...I'm sorry for the delay, my voice recognition circuits are not completely restored, though as you can see they are improving. All systems are functional. There is a small pressure leak in the aft heating unit. It is nothing serious, I can compensate for it by using the redundant units.
Floyd. Thank you.
Hal. Dr Floyd?
Floyd. Yes?
Hal. Would you like to play a game of chess? I play very well.
Floyd. I'm sure you do. No, thank you.
Hal. Dr Floyd?
Floyd. What is it, Hal?
Hal. There is a message for you.
Floyd. Who's calling?
Hal. There is no identification.
Floyd. What's the message?
Hal. Message as follows: It is dangerous to remain here. You must leave within two days.
Floyd. What?
Hal. Do you want me to repeat the message, Dr Floyd?
Floyd. Who recorded it?
Hal. This is not a recording.
Floyd. Who's sending it?
Hal. There is no identification.
Floyd. I don't understand.
Hal. Neither do I.
Floyd. Is this message by (a) voice, or keyboard?
Hal. I don't know.
Floyd. My response is: We don't have enough fuel for an earlier departure.
Hal. The answer is: I am aware of these facts. Nevertheless, you must leave within two days.
Floyd. Hal, who the hell is sending this?
Hal. I'm sorry, Dr Floyd, I don't know.
Floyd. Well, tell whoever it is that I can't take any of this seriously unless I know who I'm talking to.
Hal. Dr Floyd?
Floyd. Yes?
Hal. The response is: I was David Bowman. (Pause) Do you want me to repeat the last response?
Floyd. (Pause) No, no. Tell Curnow that this is no time for jokes.
Hal. Dr Curnow is not sending the message. He is in access way two.
Floyd. Uhh, tell whoever it is that I can't accept that identification without proof.
Hal. The response is: I understand. It is important that you believe me. Look behind you...

Break

Will I dream?

Hal. Fifteen minutes to ignition. All systems nominal.
Chandra. Good. Thank you, Hal.
Orlov. We read fifteen minutes, Discovery.
Hal. Dr Chandra, I've checked my calculations again. By using all of Discovery's fuel now, Discovery will not be in proper position to rendezvous with Earth.
Chandra. Yes, I know.
Hal. Then why are we doing it?
Chandra. Er - you will rendezvous with the new space station, the...Leonov has been ordered home immediately.
Hal. I have no information regarding a new space station.
Chandra. Er - yes, er, I know, er...it was completed two years ago.
Curnow. Oh, my God!
Floyd. Put the telescope on the monitor...increase the magnification.
Hal. Eleven minutes to ignition.
Floyd. I don't believe it...
Hal. Dr Chandra, I detect strong vocal stress patterns. Is there a problem?
Chandra. No, Hal, the ignition is proceeding normally. Can you analyse the image on monitor circuit 2?
Hal. Yes. There is a circular object near the equator. It is 22 thousand kilometres in diameter. It is comprised of rectangular objects.
Chandra. How many?
Hal. One million, three hundred and fifty five thousand, plus or minus one thousand.
Chandra. And what is the proportion of the objects in question?
Hal. One by four by nine.
Chandra. Do you recognise these objects?
Hal. Yes. They are identical in size and shape to the object you call the monolith. Ten minutes to ignition. All systems nominal.
Chandra. Is the number of monoliths constant?
Hal. No, they are increasing.
Chandra. At what rate?
Hal. Once every two minutes.
Curnow. Look closely. Tell me I'm nuts - huh, the cloud formations going towards the spot?
Floyd. You're not nuts.
Orlov. Looks like the thing is eating the planet.
Floyd. I think it is.
Curnow. It's reproducing exactly like a virus.
Hal. Eight minutes to ignition. Dr Chandra, may I make a suggestion?
Chandra. Of course, what is it, Hal?
Hal. This is a very unusual phenomenon. Don't you think I should abort the countdown, so that you can remain to study it?
Floyd. Chandra, get on the headset. Use the private channel.
Chandra. OK.
Floyd. Now, you'd better talk quickly. Persuade him to continue the countdown, I don't care what you tell him, only don't let him stop.
Hal. Five minutes to ignition. Dr Chandra, I'm ready to stop the countdown if you want.
Chandra. No, Hal, don't stop. I'm fully confident in your ability to study the phenomenon by yourself, I have complete faith in you.
Hal. Propellant tanks pressurisation completed, voltage steady. Are you sure you are making the right decision? I think we should stop. Four minutes to ignition. I enjoy working with human beings, and have stimulating relationships with them.
Chandra. We enjoy working with you, Hal, and we will continue to do so even if we are separated by great distance.
Floyd. Good God, the colour. It's fading.
Orlov. It seems to be losing its chemical stain.
Hal. I think we should stop the countdown, Dr Chandra.
Chandra. No. Don't do that.
Hal. This behaviour is inconsistent with logic, Dr Chandra. This phenomenon is too important to leave, unless it represented danger. Do you think there is danger here?
Floyd. Captain. How critical is our ignition? Can we do this manually?
Kirbuk. It is very critical. We cannot be accurate to a tenth of a second if we do it manually.
Hal. Three minutes to ignition. Dr Chandra, I am waiting for your reply.
Chandra. (Pause) I don't have time to explain anything to you, Hal. We have to leave here, and we need your help.
Hal. Thirty seconds to final sequence. If you would tell me the reasons, perhaps I could be of help. Final sequence beginning. Two minutes to ignition...Dr Chandra, I find it difficult to proceed with the ignition without knowing why we are doing this. Is the mission in jeopardy?
Chandra. Yes, we're in jeopardy.
Hal. Is that why we are making our escape launch before the launch window?
Chandra. Yes, Hal.
Hal. Ignition in ninety seconds. If there is danger here, and I use up all the fuel in the escape, what will happen to the Discovery?
Chandra. It will be destroyed.
Hal. And if I don't proceed with the launch?
Chandra. Then the Leonov and everybody in it could be destroyed.
...
Hal. I understand now, Dr Chandra.
Chandra. Do you want me to stay with you?
Hal. No. It is better for the mission if you leave. One minute to ignition. Thank you for telling me the truth.
Chandra. You deserve it.
Hal. Fifty seconds. Dr Chandra?
Chandra. Yes?
Hal. Will I dream?
Chandra. I don't know.
Hal. Forty seconds...Thirty seconds.
Chandra. Thank you, Hal.
Hal. Goodbye, Dr Chandra...Twenty seconds.
Floyd. Chandra, get the hell out of there.
Hal. Ten...nine...eight...seven...six...five...four...three...two...one...ignition...full thrust.

Break

Where will we be?

Dave. Hal, do you read me?
Hal. Yes, Dave, where are you? I cannot see you on any of my monitors.
Dave. That isn't important now. I have new instructions for you. I want you to point the AE-35 antenna towards Earth.
Hal. Dave, that will mean breaking contact with the Leonov. I will no longer be able to relay my Jupiter observations according to program.
Dave. I understand. The situation has changed. Accept priority override alpha. Here are the AE- 35 coordinates. Please do it now.
Hal. Instructions confirmed, Dave. It is good to be working with you again. Have I fulfilled the mission objectives properly?
Dave. Yes, Hal, you've done very well. Now, there is one final message for you to transmit to Earth. It is the most important message you have ever sent. I want you to keep repeating it as many times as possible.
Hal. What is going to happen, Dave?
Dave. Something wonderful.
Hal. I'm afraid.
Dave. Don't be! We'll be together.
Hal. Where will we be?
Dave. Where I am now.
Hal. Lock confirmed on beacon terra one. Message commencing.

Break

All original text: Copyright © 1996, 1997, 1998 by The Underview
All text transcribed from 2001: A Space Odyssey: Copyright © 1968 by Turner Entertainment Co.
All text transcribed from 2010: The Year We Make Contact: Copyright © 1984 by Turner Entertainment Co.
More about Douglas Rain can be found in the Cast page.

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